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Christian based service movement warning about threats to rights and freedom irrespective of the label.
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing"
Edmund Burke
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On Target

28 September 1979. Thought for the Week: "If you envisage men as being only men, you are bound to see human society, not in Christian terms as a family, but as a factory farm in which the only consideration that matters is the well being of the livestock and the prosperity or productivity of the enterprise... And it is in that situation that western man is increasingly finding himself."
Malcolm Muggeridge in "The Great Liberal Death Wish"

THE AMERICAN PROBLEM

Irrespective of what people may think of the United States, this Federation of just over two hundred years is a major factor in the international situation. Thomas Jefferson described the United States as "a universal nation pursuing universally valid ideas", while his contemporary, John Adams, claimed that the United States was destined "to govern the globe and introduce the perfection of man."
On one hand the United States has made a special contribution to furthering the best features of Western Civilisation, while on the other hand the enormous wealth has been used as a base by international financiers and their associates to work towards the age-old goal for a World State.

With an over exaggerated self righteousness linked with a generous nature, the American people have proved almost perfect material for involvement in grandiose and highly idealistic international projects. As so brilliantly described by Douglas Reed in "The Controversy of Zion", the idealistic schoolteacher Woodrow Wilson was brought to the Presidency in the United States to further the "Grand Design" of the semi-secret forces responsible for his election. The League of Nations, forerunner to the United Nations, was promoted by Wilson at the end of the First World War.

The United States was the base from which Wall Street international financiers operated to impose Bolshevism upon the unfortunate peoples of Russia. It was the base from which the attack on the old British Empire was sustained. It is the base from which blood transfusions for maintaining the Communist Empire are financed. The United Nations is based in the United States. The people of the United States, and their resources, have been sucked into disasters like Vietnam. But the end result has been the growing disillusionment with the international ideals first enunciated by Jefferson and Adams.

Perhaps one of the most hopeful developments in the world crisis is that the American people are increasingly rejecting the concept of being used to create New World Orders. They have "seen through" Jimmy Carter and do not believe that the "energy crisis" is anything but a hoax designed to try to strip them of still more of their independence. Congress, reflecting a much better informed American public opinion, is increasingly resisting the President. A combination of hard, bitter experiences and an education programme in depth has produced a much more encouraging situation in the United States.


AUSTRALIAN POLITICAL TURMOIL

Columnist Claude Forell, writing in "The Age", Melbourne, of September 26th, claims that political parties "play an essential role in our parliamentary democracy…"
Mr. Forell is one of those attempting to foster the policy of having political parties funded out of public taxes, one argument being that the financial costs of advertising are so enormous that the parties have problems in obtaining sufficient finance without accepting big donations from companies or groups.

While it is true that rising inflation is having its effect on electioneering, it is not true that a genuine democracy is possible under the present rigid party system. This type of system is relatively modern. And, as demonstrated by James Guthrie in "Our Sham Democracy" ($1.35) the party system is manipulated to ensure that the will of the people does not prevail. The growing political turmoil in Australia, at present the spotlight being on the clash between the Liberal and National parties, is a manifestation of the disintegration of what is left of the democratic system. It also manifests the philosophy of the will-to-power.

Having collaborated with the Liberals for years in imposing policies, which eroded the rural communities of Australia, the National Party finds itself in the position where, with a dwindling base, it is becoming increasingly difficult for it to resist the Liberal Party take-over bid. The base is, however, still sufficiently strong to launch a new offensive against present finance economic policies. But this would require the use of the rural base as a balancing factor. Unless something along these lines is attempted, the National Party is doomed to political elimination.

There is no evidence that it has the capacity at present to break into Metropolitan electorates with orthodox party political campaigns. But it has the opportunity of initiating a national campaign which would force the two major parties on to the defensive. The one man with the potential to do this is the Queensland Premier, J. Bjelke-Petersen.

Rather than see the Queensland Liberal Party's attempt to run a separate Senate team at the next Senate Elections, as a disaster, the Queensland National Party should use it as an opportunity to give a lead to the whole of Australia. Contrary to the general assessment, we believe that a properly conducted non-partisan campaign, hitting the great issues of the moment, would ensure that Senator Glen Sheil is re-elected.

Premier Bjelke-Petersen and his colleagues are now being forced into the position where they must present a constructive offensive or they will eventually be overwhelmed. It could prove a blessing in disguise if Senator Glen Sheil is forced to head an independent National Party Senate team without having to consider the Liberal Party at all.


BRIEF COMMENTS

No sooner had South Australian Liberal Party leader Tonkin become Premier than he changed his attitude on the battle concerning the future of the Bank of Adelaide. Prior to the State elections, Mr. Tonkin said that he was "very strongly behind the retention of a trading bank based in South Australia, a bank of our own." Now Mr. Tonkin urges support for a merger with the A.N.Z. group. This group is internationalist. Mr. Tonkin can provide all the support necessary for preserving the Bank of Adelaide as a separate entity by using his constitutional powers concerning State banking. This is an issue South Australian readers might take up with their State Liberal Party Members of Parliament.

Foreign Minister Peacock has described the ousted Pol Pot regime of Kampuchea as " an evil and vicious despotism". But at the United Nations, Australia has supported the retention of the seat held by Pol Pot. Defending the decision, Acting Foreign Minister Sinclair said in Parliament, "While we retain a good deal of cynicism about the manner and form of the Pol Pot Government, we do not believe it appropriate for us at this time to change out attitudes or views with respect to the future." How different from the treatment over the years of the Rhodesian Government.

No doubt reflecting the mood of the American electors, the American House of Representatives has voted to bar international banks from using U.S. funds to aid Cuba, Vietnam, Kampuchea, Angola and the Central African Republic. Do Australian taxpayers recall how the Fraser Government, following the lead of the Whitlam Government, donated over a million dollars worth of aid to Communist dominated Mozambique? Perhaps they might be interested in the current plight of Mozambique as a result of the millions of dollars poured in by countries like Australia. The programme of nationalisation started by the Machel Marxist Government in 1975 has produced shortages of all types of food, including sugar. Discontent is growing amongst the people, as the shortages get worse. The Soviet has exclusive fishing rights. No doubt when famine conditions develop these will be well publicised so that the peoples of the Free World can make a further substantial aid contribution. In the meantime, in spite of the continuing terror campaign, neighbouring Zimbabwe Rhodesia continues to produce adequate supplies of food for over six million people with surpluses to export.

The latest reports on Japan's contribution towards assisting Vietnamese refugees show that only one family of three has been given permission to settle permanently in Japan. The Japanese are prepared to contribute towards settling refugees anywhere but in Japan.

So far from being influenced by the worldwide criticism of the World Council of Churches' support for the Zimbabwe-Rhodesian terrorists; the W.C.C. has made a further grant of $32,000 to the terrorists. The grant was made by the WCC's fund "to combat racism" at the request of the Patriotic Front. There was no grant to any other groups, certainly none for Bishop Muzorewa whose Government has to look after the victims of the terrorist raids. The W.C.C. made the ridiculous claim that their contribution would help the Patriotic Front finance its delegation to the London Conference. One of the little publicised aspects of the London Conference is that big financial interests have been looking after Mr. Mugabe and Mr. Nkomo. Those providing the finance are no doubt trying to insure against the future. They are shallow and cynical. But what is the W.C.C. about? It has some strange allies.

As pointed out by National Secretary of the Institute of Economic Democracy, Mr. Jeremy Lee, the fantastic increase in the price of gold reflects the fact that the American dollar is now almost completely destroyed as a reserve international currency. Reports in the financial press reveal that the stage is being set for the attempted establishment of a new international currency, bancor. A major depression may be needed to try to jolt the free world into taking the next steps towards the New International Economic Order. Continuing exposure of the N.I.E.O. is therefore imperative at this critical time. The booklet to use is, of course, Jeremy Lee's "Upon That Mountain", $1.25.

© Published by the Australian League of Rights, P.O. Box 27 Happy Valley, SA 5159