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Christian based service movement warning about threats to rights and freedom irrespective of the label.
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing"
Edmund Burke
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18 January 1980. Thought for the Week: "It was only when I lay there on rotten prison straw that I sensed within myself the first stirrings of good. Gradually it was disclosed to me that the line separating Good and Evil passes, not through States nor between political classes, but right through every human heart - and through all human hearts... And that is why I turn back to the years of my Imprisonment and say, sometimes to the astonishment of those about me; 'Bless you, prison, for having been in my life."
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

RETREATING TOWARDS 1984

In his New Year message to the Nation, Prime Minister Fraser provided yet another example of the shallow approach by the modern party political leaders to the great issues confronting a disintegrating Civilisation. Like some of his colleagues, Mr. Fraser spoke optimistically about prospects for the coming decade of the 80s. Mr. Fraser, of course, has to face an election this year. But unless his Government drastically changes the financial policies, which have made a mockery of promises given before the last two Federal Elections, it does not really matter whether Mr. Bill Hayden or Mr. Fraser is Prime Minister.

During the past decade, Australia has had both Liberal-National Coalition Governments and a Labor Government. The sheer ineptitude of the Gorton and McMahon Governments paved the way for the Whitlam Government. The Whitlam policies produced the electoral backlash, which brought Malcolm Fraser to office. But during this decade can any honest person point to any basic changes in Australia?

The Imposition of taxation became progressively harsher. High inflation continued, the Fraser Government forcing only a temporary reduction by a financial policy which has helped swell the ranks of the unemployed and increased the number of business bankruptcies. Social disintegration continued.

A much more reliable witness than Mr. Fraser and his fellow politicians concerning prospects for the next decade is Mr. Malcolm Muggeridge. After reviewing the disasters of the past decade, which he describes as one of the "lost utopias", Muggeridge writes; "A good place for considering how matters now stand as between the two so-called superpowers in the light of this great accession of Russian power is standing on the Berlin Wall, with on one side the Western city, on the other the Eastern city, and in between the no man's land dividing the two, with its land mines, its armed patrols, its guard dogs and lookout posts. "Let us suppose we are standing on the Wall at dusk. In West Berlin already the neon lights are already coming out, announcing the evening's pleasures, restaurants and hotels, striptease joints and sex shops, theatres and cinemas and discos, the news even, in dancing illuminated letters - all the munificence in entertainment, pleasure and refreshments 20th century hedonism has to offer, spelt out in luminous words against the gathering darkness; the pursuit of happiness like a rainbow across the sky. "Then, in East Berlin, the characteristic evening street scene in any communist city - pedestrians hurrying homeward with that curious, somehow furtive walk of people who have grown accustomed to living with fear and privation; shops with few goods to display in their windows, and only very occasional motor cars; lights coming out meagerly one by one, by comparison with the blaze across the way, and with the frontier so near, a noticeable police presence.... "At a walk, two lost utopias conjoin, and like two drunks, in a certain sense hold on to one another, their confrontation being clearly in terms, not of freedom and servitude, but of two different kinds of servitude."

Nothing has so dramatically and chillingly demonstrated the servitude of the West than the pathetic attempt to meet the Soviet's latest demonstration of its determination to use naked power when necessary to expand its Empire. President Carter, by an apparent show of strength, may restore his electoral stocks with an American electorate, which has first been humiliated and frustrated by the treatment of American hostages in Iran, and now shocked by the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. But why the shock about events in Afghanistan? The Afghanistan affair is but a continuation of a policy, which resulted in the use of brutal force in Hungary and Czechoslovakia. When the Soviet airlifted Cuban troops into Angola, Solzhenitsyn warned that the first blow had been struck in the Third World War, which would decide the future of Civilisation. The West prevented South Africa from beating back the Communist invasion of Africa, allowing the Soviet to use Cuban troops at will in different parts of the African continent. The Soviet conquest of Ethiopia was as much a threat to the West as the move into Afghanistan.
During the decade of the 70s the Soviet increased its global power enormously. But it was only able to do this as a result of massive blood transfusions from the West, much of it provided on credit created by Western-based international financial institutions.

The Crown Commonwealth League of Rights, representing the British, Canadian, New Zealand and Australian League of Rights, is the only association in the Free World, which has thoroughly exposed and documented what can only be described as a policy of treachery, and has campaigned actively for an end to the treachery. Now President Carter has - in an election year! - conceded that the Soviet, whom he has been aiding and abetting, could be vulnerable to some type of sanctions. Prime Minister Fraser and his Deputy, Mr. Doug Anthony, have belatedly also conceded that the League was right.
It was only three years ago that Mr. Fraser and Mr. Anthony were endorsing Australian exports to the Soviet. Mr. Anthony visited Moscow and had the most eulogistic remarks to make about his treatment. He was the guest of the same gang of power men showing their contempt for the West in Afghanistan.

As we have so often pointed out, the basic Achilles heel of the West is a finance-economic policy which forces it to strive to pour an increasing flood of production out of industrialised nations in a desperate attempt to make internal economies operate. The Soviet strategists understand this and must watch with amused contempt the futile attempts of President Carter to have imposed a major economic blockade of the Soviet. The West German and French Governments have already made it clear that they have no intention of stopping vital technological aid to the Soviet. We will predict now that after some ineffective wrist tapping no effective action will be taken against the Soviet.

As the brilliant British anti-Communist expert and military strategist, Sir Robert Thompson, has frankly stated, the only hope now for the West is a coordinated Western political and psychological offensive against the Soviet. But unless that offensive is undertaken, it is only a matter of time before the Soviet moves from Afghanistan into a disintegrating Iran.
The desperate Indians have decided to vote for slavery under one of the most revolting political humbugs of this sick century. Mrs. Gandhi who has already made it clear that she is pro-Soviet. One of the great prophets of this century was George Orwell, a moral man who learned about the realities of Communism the hard way. In his last major work, "Nineteen Eighty Four", Orwell warned of the danger of growing centralised power, of Big Brother and the complete Totalitarian State. Orwell predicted a world of growing chaos in which power is the only reality.
As the Roman Civilisation was disintegrating, with crushing taxation and inflation basic causes, a desperate people called for a strong Caesar. Faced with the choice of chaos or dictatorship, and knowing of no answers to their problems, desperate people will generally decide for some type of dictatorship.

When he was writing "Nineteen Eighty Four" in 1948, Orwell was a sick and dying man. He died two years later at the age of 47. The decade of the 80s will decide whether Orwell prophesised correctly or not. Nothing now can be done about the past - except to learn its lessons so that action may be taken to preserve freedom, now struggling to survive like a small candle buffeted by mounting storm winds. The 1980s will prove to be the decade of truth. The deceitful vaporings of the party politicians must be spurned. Reality, however unpleasant, must be faced. Events are graphically confirming the work of the League of Rights over many long years. Regretfully, as Solzhenitsyn pointed out, Reality is the great teacher. Freedom is appreciated only when it is lost, or is seriously threatened. Those responsible for the conduct of the League have systematically prepared for what they knew must be the period of great testing. That period is now upon us. Great demands, - physical, moral and financial will be made upon all supporters of this and other League journals. If we fail to meet these demands, all will be lost. We pray to God that we shall not stumble at this time.


BRIEF COMMENTS

A spokesman for the "Patriotic" Front has been quoted as saying that the role of Prime Minister Fraser at the Lusaka Commonwealth Conference, which paved the way for the "agreement" concerning Rhodesia, was appreciated by the Front. All the developments since Lusaka have paved the way for a Marxist takeover in Rhodesia. Mr. Patrick Wall, M.P., Chairman of the British Conservative Parliamentary Affairs Committee, and an authority on Southern Africa, warns that the Constitution agreed to at the Lancaster House Conference is no guarantee of the future of the Europeans in Rhodesia, including those in the public service. The brave Rev. Father Arthur Lewis of the Rhodesia Christian Group bluntly states, "Not for nothing is Rhodesia to be called Zimbabwe - a ruin built by slaves. A ruined land will help the Soviet to control the people and the British to extract the minerals." The West's betrayal of little Rhodesia was one of the most sickening episodes of the 70s.
© Published by the Australian League of Rights, P.O. Box 27 Happy Valley, SA 5159